Contact Us

Have any questions? Fill out this form and we will do our best to contact you within 24 hours. Thank you!

Name *
Name
         

123 Street Avenue, City Town, 99999

(123) 555-6789

email@address.com

 

You can set your address, phone number, email and site description in the settings tab.
Link to read me page with more information.

MUSIC

Jalopy Bungus Drops New Album, "Samson"

Kassandra Ramirez

by KBR

It is often said that everyone can be an artist. While I agree that anyone can make art, I believe being an artist is a much more distinct quality. While art is a form of expression, what makes art special is that it can also be perceived, different for every viewer. Constantly looking for artists to feature on our blog, I always search for artists whose voices speak. When discovering Jalopy Bungus, I immediately saw this quality.

Jalopy Bungus - Photo by  KBR

Jalopy Bungus - Photo by KBR

What separates Jalopy Bungus from other artists in the Arizona hip hop scenes is his undeniable talent for conveying his emotions toward his audience. Reoccurring themes in Jalopy Bungus’s new album “Samson” include living in the projects, the struggle of being black in America, and even suicide, all touchy subjects.

After hearing the new album “Samson,” which dropped on February 22nd, I was lucky enough to land an interview with Jalopy Bungus himself. I met him for a 90-minute interview and photoshoot at his apartment complex, and captured some magic outside right around the block. During the interview, Bungus gave me some insight into the meaning of his tracks and creative process behind it all. After my experience, I am convinced the world will hear all about Jalopy Bungus.

This interview has been edited for clarity

What makes you unique form other artists in the Arizona music scene?

What separates me from everybody out here is I’m not afraid to talk about the risky stuff. I live on my own accord.

Tell us about your creative process.

Recently, I don’t really write anything unless I have something to say. If it’s not really true to my heart, I can’t put it down. However long I am supposed to wait until that pops up is how long I am going to wait. However, there is a thin line between discipline and inspiration, a very thin line. You don’t want to wait to be inspired.

There is too much of “this” to not be inspired.

Jalopy Bungus - Photo by  KBR

Jalopy Bungus - Photo by KBR

How was the experience collaborating with singer Dali?

Dali is pretty much my soulmate. I have known her since 2015 this was the first track with just me and her on it. We have been wanting to collab for so long. She truly is a once-in-a-lifetime talent.

The song “Procrastinating Suicide” was particularly difficult to get done. Dali was in Oregon at the time, and when I sent her the song, she recorded the stems and when she sent them back they were all choppy and messed up. It was super last minute, so it was a mess. The last day of the project being finished, I had to mix about 90 vocals stems the day before I turned the project in to Distrokid so it could be uploaded to all platforms.

Who is “Vocal Cords of a Broken Woman” written about? Is there going to be a Part 2?

I can’t say yet, but it is about someone I know. The story is still being written. Part 1 is just the very beginning of the story.

What is “Cut the Rope” about?

“Cut the Rope” is about having withdrawals from whatever you are addicted to and how it effects you. You know you know better, but somehow you can’t stop. Well, you can, but you don’t because are addicted to it.

I was addicted to nearly committing suicide at one point. I never did it, but I thought about it. I would think about all types of ways to do it.

Have you ever been worried about some of your songs influencing someone negatively? Particularly your track “Procrastinating Suicide”?

I was definitely scared to put “Procrastinating Suicide” on the projects because I could see where someone might kill themselves because of the song. In a way, that is part of the reason why I put it out. I always want to promote individuality. The message of the song is don’t kill yourself because someone doesn’t want you to. Don’t kill yourself because you don’t want to kill yourself.

Japoly Bungus - Photo by  KBR

Japoly Bungus - Photo by KBR

Tell us more about your track “Latarian Milton.”

Latarian Milton is that little boy who stole his mom’s car because he “just wanted to do hood rat shit with his friends.” Imagine being like 7 and being turned into a superstar because of it. You’re doing Tosh.o, you’re on Boondocks. The world rewarded him for for his actions. He went on to carjack an uber when he was 17, and they sent him to prison. They used him until he couldn’t bring ratings anymore.

The song is about being black and all the things that come with it. “Mama told me I’m a king/school told me I’m a slave.” That’s real.

What can we expect from Jalopy Bungus in the near future?

I will definitely have another show for “Samson” this spring. Continue to look out for my content, because plans are in motion to transform “Samson” into a visual project, with each song having its own video.

Listen to “Samson” on Soundcloud, Spotify, and all major platforms.